Friday, December 11, 2009

Tributes

My brother, Greg and I each came up with a tribute to share at my mom's Memorial Service.

I introduced my reading with the thoughts that the biggest thing I valued and learned from my mom was the freedom we were given to follow whatever paths we desired. She supported us regardless of what direction those paths took big city or coutry, lots of children or not, religion or not. She loved us and encouraged us regardless of our choices. She didn't always agree or understand, but she did not judge and she did love.

I chose a song from an album I listened to over and over again as a child. I still can recite some of it from memory. I have sicne downloaded it and the tunes and skits are comforting. Free to Be You and Me from the album of the same name by Marlo Thomas and friends:
There's a land that I see where the children are free
And I say it ain't far to this land from where we are
Take my hand, come with me, where the children are free
Come with me, take my hand, and we'll live

In a land where the river runs free
In a land through the green country
In a land to a shining sea
And you and me are free to be you and me

I see a land bright and clear, and the time's comin' near
When we'll live in this land, you and me, hand in hand
Take my hand, come along, lend your voice to my song
Come along, take my hand, sing a song

For a land where the river runs free
For a land through the green country
For a land to a shining sea
For a land where the horses run free
And you and me are free to be you and me

Every boy in this land grows to be his own man
In this land, every girl grows to be her own woman
Take my hand, come with me where the children are free
Come with me, take my hand, and we'll run

To a land where the river runs free
To a land through the green country
To a land to a shining sea
To a land where the horses run free
To a land where the children are free
And you and me are free to be
And you and me are free to be
And you and me are free to be you and me



My brother was more original, but didn't read his tribute, my dad did (and got through it amazingly well).







What My Mom Taught Me

On December 2, 1971 My Mom went to the hospital to bring me into the world. I guess I wasn’t ready, because I didn’t make it easy on her. But I eventually emerged. On this day My Mom taught me how to breathe.

When I was 1 My Mom left me alone in the kitchen with my older sister. She painted my face purple. We My Mom came back, she took a picture before she cleaned my face and I’m sure she had a chuckle. On this day My Mom taught me how to laugh.

When I was 3 My Mom dropped me off at Habitat for my first day of pre-school. I’m sure I cried – didn’t we all. On this day My Mom taught me how to learn. When I was 4 My Mom and I played Monopoly. She let me be the banker. I’m pretty sure I didn’t cheat, she wouldn’t have let me. On this day My Mom taught me how to do math. When I was 5 we moved across town to a new neighborhood. Our new neighborhood was very diverse both racially and socio-economically. In this move My Mom taught me the value of diversity.

When I was 6 My Mom asked me if I wanted to skip kindergarten or not. I said no. I wasn’t ready. She may have disagreed, but thought it was my option. On this day My Mom taught me how to make decisions.

When I was 8 My Mom dropped me off at my first soccer practice. I’m not sure she knew what she was getting into. 8 years, 500 practices, 200 games later she may have regretted it, but on this day My Mom taught me how to compete.

When I was 10 My Mom was diagnosed with leukemia. I didn’t know what it was, but I was scared. I sent her a baboon so she would get well soon. I guess it worked because she beat it. On this day My Mom taught me how to fight.

When I was 11 My Mom drove me around in the car on the first day of my new paper route. From then on I road my bike – well, unless it was raining. On this day My Mom taught me how to work.

When I was 14 My Mom bought me my first guitar and sent me to guitar lessons. On this day My Mom taught me how to Rock…I since seem to have forgotten.

When I was 16 I wrecked my car. I wasn’t badly hurt, but the car that I had saved for for 3 years was totaled. My Mom was there to comfort me even though I had made some bad decisions. On that day My Mom taught me how to be understanding.

When I was 17 My Mom drove me to 15 different colleges in 10 different states from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Six months later, encouraged by her to take the leap, I dropped my acceptance letter to a California college into the mail. She new I’d be far away, but she knew it would be good for me. On this trip My Mom taught me how to dream.

When I was 18 I left Indianapolis for college and was on my own. I talked to My Mom by phone regularly over my college years. She was always there to support me in whatever I was doing. In these years My Mom taught me how to be an adult.

When I was 37 My Mom came out to California to see me get married. She said to me, “Your friends say such nice things about you. I must have done something right for the first 18 years”. She did. On this day My Mom knew she had taught me everything I needed to know.

Two months later my mom was in the hospital in critical condition and I came out to be with her. Shortly after, she passed away peacefully knowing she had raised her son to be the type of person she admired. On this day My Mom taught me how to say good bye.



We also sang 4 songs...darned if I can't remember them all. Mom would have enjoyed that the most. We sang Can't Keep From Singing by Pete Seger, Lean on Me, ______, and Simple Gifts, in a round even.

4 comments:

Christine said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Christine said...

She certainly was a lovely garland about his neck in this lifetime.

Anonymous said...

These are beautiful and touching tributes to your mom, Becky. They inspire me to be a more loving mom and grandma to my children today. Just wanted you to know I'm thinking of you and praying for you and the kids as you go through this first holiday after your mom's passing, that God's peace and comfort will carry you through. Love, Mimi

Word Designer said...

I'm so sorry about your mom. Its very hard to watch someone you love step through the veil. I know it is not as comforting now as it will be later, but you will see her again.

When my mom passed away, even though I was 39 years old, I suddenly felt like an orphan. I suspect you do, too. If I can be of help in any way, please let me know. My heart is breaking for you and your family. I'm sending a BIG virtual H U G . I hope it helps. Many blessings.

Wordy
Word Designer